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Bob's Hill Boys Troop 3 has been supported by New England Congregational's congregation from the very beginning, and has shown strong support for the Troop and the ideals of Scouting every year since. This relationship makes Troop 3 one of a very few in the nation to be continuously chartered by the same sponsor since its origin in 1910. The Troop’s meeting place is one of the finest in the area. This space has been provided by the church since the 1920’s. It was re-furbished in the 1940’s and at that time was dedicated as Norton Hall, named after the first Scoutmaster. It remains in that historic state today.

Today’s adult leaders of Troop 3 are proud of the long history of Troop 3 and believe in the Scouting principles upon which it was founded. We are doing our best to adhere to the concept of building character by stressing application of the Scout Oath and the Scout Law in everyday life, and encouraging a boy-run Troop, both of which were part of Baden-Powell’s original plan.

We accept new Scouts crossing over from Webelo's from all area schools.  We currently have 49 registered Scouts and 52 registered Adult Leaders.  Our Scouts look forward each year to the Welte Survival Campout held during Spring break in Wisconsin at the Welte Ranch.  Please use the Contact Us form under the Menu if you are interested in joining our Troop or would like someone to contact you with more information.  We have a Webelo's to Scouts transition guide we can e-mail you and can have one of our Leaders in charge of Weeblo's transition contact you.

The Troop has meetings each Monday and has camp-outs scheduled monthly for the Scouts to attend.  We also take part in Snow Base High Adventure each February and plan a High Adventure for Scouts to attend each Summer as well as our Council's and Districts activities.

 

OUR HISTORY

Lord Robert S.S. Baden-Powell created his version of Scouting from his experiences in the military while in Africa. He fostered an appreciation of the outdoors by teaching outdoor skills and encouraged good character development through his Scout Oath and Law. After his return to England from the Boer Wars, in 1906, Baden-Powell began to work with boys in his community, refining his concept and his Scout Handbook. The program began to grow in England.

In 1909, W.D. Boyce, a Chicago newspaper publisher, was in London on business. While trying to find his way on a very foggy night, a young man came out of the mist to offer him direction. He led him to his destination, then disappeared back into the mist after refusing reward. The Scout explained that a Scout was to perform good deeds without expecting or accepting pay. Though this Scout was never identified, Boyce was so impressed with the Scout concept that, during the next few days, he sought out Baden-Powell and talked with him at length about his Scouting concept.

Upon his return to the United States, he set about establishing the Boy Scout program. Boys flocked to the idea, and in June of 1910 the United States Congress incorporated the Boy Scouts of America. The "movement" took hold and grew quickly to include several hundred thousand youth and leaders within the next few years.

Charles H. Norton, a Sunday School teacher at New England Congregational church, took note of the new movement, acquired a Scout Handbook, studied it while on his travels as a salesman, and during the summer of 1910 formed Troop 3’s first Patrol of boys from those in his Sunday School class. There is evidence that Troop 3 was formally recognized by the National office in September of 1910. Record-keeping was not the best, and the first actual Charter was made in 1914. Troop 3 was the third Troop formed in the Aurora Area Council. Troop 1 was formed by the YMCA, Troop 2 was formed by a Baptist church on the east side of Aurora. Neither of these Troops is in existence today.

In 1912, Charles Pierce Burton, a newspaper journalist for the Beacon News, wrote The Boy Scouts of Bob’s Hill, a book about Scouting based upon a blend of his own childhood experiences and the experiences of his son Malcolm, a charter member of Troop 3. This book became quite popular among boys since books for boys were not common. About ten more books in the Bob’s Hill Boys series were written up to the early 1920’s. It was about this time that the Troop adopted the name "Bob’s Hill Troop 3". Several of the Burton books, collected by former Scoutmaster Tom Godfrey in the mid-1980’s, are displayed in our display case in the Scout room.

New England Congregational's congregation supported the development of the Troop from the very beginning, and has shown strong support for the Troop and the ideals of Scouting every year since. This relationship makes Troop 3 one of a very few in the nation to be continuously chartered by the same sponsor since its origin in 1910. The Troop’s meeting place is one of the finest in the area. This space has been provided by the church since the 1920’s. It was re-furbished in the 1940’s and at that time was dedicated as Norton Hall, named after the first Scoutmaster. It remains in that historic state today. A virtual tour of Norton Hall will soon be available.

Today’s adult leaders of Troop 3 are proud of the long history of Troop 3 and believe in the Scouting principles upon which it was founded. We are doing our best to adhere to the concept of building character by stressing application of the Scout Oath and the Scout Law in everyday life, and encouraging a boy-run Troop, both of which were part of Baden-Powell’s original plan.